Lunch and Learn: Mars Analog on Earth

AIAA Houston section presents Free Lunch-and-Learn event: Analog missions

– Date: Monday, August 27, 2018
Time: 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM presentation by CESARE GUARINIELLO, PhD.
Presentation start time: Noon.
Place: Tietronix, 1331 Gemini Avenue, Suite 300, Houston Texas 77058.
Cost: No charge for attending. Membership not required.
Meal: AIAA Houston Section provides sandwiches (our treat) from Jimmy Johns based on the crowd size using the online registration. Walk-ins are welcome, but advance registration helps us to plan better.
Registration: (www.aiaahouston.org) or our EventBrite web page. Walk-ins are welcome. Advance registration helps us to plan better. The bigger the audience, the better.

Going to Mars is hard, much harder than anything else we ever tried. Most of the people involved in this field are pushing for an Apollo-style approach, based on step-by-step technology development and testing to approach missions to Mars. However, going to the Moon or even just to Earth orbit is still very expensive. One way to perform effective research towards the exploration of Mars at a lower cost is the use of Mars Analogs on Earth. These are areas that, because of isolated and unusual environment, provide physical and psychological situations similar to those found on Mars. Habitats have been built in these regions that allow for simulated Mars missions. The Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), near Hanksville, UT, comprises a habitat, a greenhouse, a scientific laboratory, and an astronomical observatory and can host up to 7 people for 2-week simulated missions. Cesare Guariniello served as crew geologist in mission MDRS 186, and used every minute of his 2-week rotation to gather not only scientific data, but an astonishing personal experience. His presentation will touch both these aspects of his mission, with emphasis on the value and limitations of analog missions to support human exploration of Mars.

CESARE GUARINIELLO, PhD

Cesare GuarinielloCesare is a Research Associate in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics in Purdue University He holds two Master degrees, in Automation and Robotics Engineering and in Astronautical Engineering, from the University of Rome “La Sapienza”, and a PhD in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Purdue University. His research ranges from System-of-Systems design and architecture to space applications, cybersecurity, and defense and includes projects with NASA, the US DoD, the US Navy, and MITRE corporation. Cesare recently expanded his research in the field of Earth Sciences, where he is pursuing a Master degree in Planetary Geology. He is a member of various professional societies, including IEEE, AIAA, and INCOSE.

Outside academia, Cesare enjoys a wide variety of activities. After representing Purdue University in various collegiate tournaments, he is now the coach of Purdue Fencing Club. He is a licensed radio amateur, a private pilot, and a certified scuba diver. In 2017, he began participating in simulated missions as analog astronaut.

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Lunch and Learn: Mars Analog on Earth

– Date: Monday, August 27, 2018
Time: 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM presentation by CESARE GUARINIELLO, PhD.
Presentation start time: Noon.
Place: Tietronix, 1331 Gemini Avenue, Suite 300, Houston Texas 77058.
Cost: No charge for attending. Membership not required.
Meal: AIAA Houston Section provides sandwiches (our treat) from Jimmy Johns based on the crowd size using the online registration. Walk-ins are welcome, but advance registration helps us to plan better.
Registration: On the event page or our EventBrite. Walk-ins are welcome. Advance registration helps us to plan better. The bigger the audience, the better.

2016 AIAA Houston Section Awards Banquet

Please join us as we wrap up a spectacular 2015-16 year with the AIAA-Houston Awards Banquet! The keynote speaker will be Dr. John B. Charles, Chief Scientist of NASA’s Human Research Program.

We will also be presenting the awards for the year to AIAA members who became Senior Members, Associate Fellows, Fellows, and Honorary Fellows, as well as those celebrating an anniversary with AIAA. Please come out and congratulate them with us!

Speaker: Dr. John B. Charles, Chief Scientist of NASA’s Human Research Program
Topic: “The Year-long ISS Expedition, the Twins Study, and Preparations for Mars.”
Date: Friday, June 10, 2016
Location: JSC Gilruth Center, Alamo Ballroom

Times:

Ticket Prices:

  • Presentation Only (No Dinner): FREE!
  • Dinner, AIAA Member/Spouse: $20.00
  • Dinner, Non-Member: $25.00
  • Dinner, Student with ID: $7.00

Speaker Biography:

John B. Charles, Ph.D., is the Chief Scientist of NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP), a position he also held from 2006 to 2012. He provides scientific direction of research and development enabling astronauts to go beyond low Earth orbit and eventually to Mars.

Dr. Charles earned his B.S. in biophysics at The Ohio State University and his doctorate in physiology and biophysics at the University of Kentucky. He came to the Johnson Space Center in 1983 a postdoctoral fellow and became a civil servant in 1985. He is co-developer of the Shuttle-era fluid-loading countermeasure, and investigated the cardiovascular effects of space flight using ultrasound, re-entry data recording and in-flight lower body negative pressure (LBNP) on Space Shuttle astronauts and on crewmembers of the Russian space station Mir. He coordinated the NASA-sponsored biomedical, biological and microgravity science investigations as Mission Scientist for NASA-Mir, for STS-95, John Glenn’s Shuttle flight, and for STS-107, Columbia’s last mission in January 2003.

From 20012 to 2015, he was HRP’s Associate Manager for International Science and led NASA’s space life sciences planning and international coordination for the joint US/Russian one-year mission on ISS, including the Twins Study.

He is a Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association and has been a member since 1983. He is a Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) and co-chaired the IAA’s 18th “Humans in Space Symposium” in Houston in 2011.

He has published over 60 scientific articles, and has received several professional awards.

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Todd Barber: “Red Rover, Red Rover: Send Curiosity Right Over”

Abstract: “Red Rover, Red Rover: Send Curiosity Right Over”

Curiosity’s mission to the red planet will be covered in detail. Topics to be discussed include a bit on the history of Mars rovers at JPL, the scientific motivation for Curiosity, and the preparations for launch two days after Thanksgiving in 2011. The science suite on board this one-ton mega rover will be presented, as well as the engineering challenges involved in getting Curiosity to the launch pad, traveling 352 million miles to Mars over 8.5 months, and ‘sticking the landing’ following the so-called ‘seven minutes of terror’ on August 5th, 2012. Early mission science results will be presented as well, followed by pop-culture reaction to the rover landing.

Biography

Todd Barber is a JPL senior propulsion engineer, now working as lead propulsion engineer on the Cassini mission to Saturn following part-time work on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, Deep Impact mission, and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, which landed the large rover Curiosity on the red planet on August 5th, 2012. Cassini was launched on October 15, 1997 on its two-billion-mile, seven-year journey to the ringed planet. The MER team launched launch twin rovers to the red planet in June and July of 2003, and Opportunity is still going strong over nine years after landing. Todd also worked as the lead impactor propulsion engineer on Deep Impact, which successfully crashed into Comet Tempel-1 on Independence Day, 2005, at twenty-three-thousand miles per hour.

Mr. Barber worked on the Galileo project for over seven years and his primary responsibility was getting Galileo into Jupiter orbit on December 7, 1995. Todd also worked part-time on the Space Infra-Red Telescope Facility (SIRTF) mission and on the Stardust mission, as well as the Mars Sample Return mission and a Mars airplane study. Todd received NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Award in 1996 for his work on Galileo. He also worked three years on the Deep Space One mission, the first NASA mission to use electric propulsion (a la “Star Trek”). This mission included flybys of a near-Earth asteroid, Braille, and a comet named Borrelly.

Mr. Barber is a native of Wichita, Kansas, and attended MIT between 1984 and 1990, obtaining B.S. and M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering, with a humanities concentration in music. He is also a composer of church choral music, with two pieces published to date. His hobbies include singing charitably and professionally, playing the piano, visiting all the U.S. tri-state corners and national parks, playing basketball (though it’s been a while), and amateur astronomy.

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May/June 2014 Horizons Issue

The May/June 2014 issue of Horizons is now online (46 pages in a 9 MB PDF file). Horizons is the newsletter of the Houston Section of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). This issue’s cover story is, “Morpheus, The Ups and Downs of an Autonomous Lander,” by Jon Olansen, NASA/JSC. This issue also contains climate change science and public policy articles, a book review by Bill West of the novel The Martian, by Andy Weir, a report on the 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, by Larry Jay Friesen, and articles and schedules from the Johnson Space Center Astronomical Society (JSCAS), including, “Building an Astronomer’s Chair,” by Jim Wessel, and a summary of a presentation to JSCAS members by NASA astronaut Dr. Stanley G. Love, “Challenges of Traveling to Mars.”