AIAA Houston Dinner Meeting: Exploring The Solar System Through Low-Latency Telepresence (LLT)

Join AIAA Houston and Dan Adamo on a discussion on “Exploring The Solar System Through Low-Latency Telepresence (LLT)”

Why would it make sense to send humans more than 99% of the way to an off-Earth exploration destination like Mars without putting “boots on the ground”? How can average speeds achieved by robotic Mars rovers, typically a leisurely 0.4 meters per hour, be dramatically increased? This 1.5-hour lecture will answer these questions by suggesting humans operate in synergy with nearby robotic systems as a game-changing space exploration strategy. When command/feedback delays between human explorers and their robotic proxies are reduced sufficiently, today’s user interface technology can impart multi-sensory impressions of “being there”, a state of cognizance called low-latency telepresence (LLT). Using LLT-based strategies, impressive exploration productivity gains are realizable, together with reduced programmatic cost and risk, when compared to more conventional exploration strategies based on the Apollo Program circa 1970. These benefits accrue regardless of whether humans orbit above or loiter on/beneath a nearby exploration region.

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AIAA Houston Dinner Meeting: Exploring The Solar System Through Low-Latency Telepresence (LLT) and Houston Spaceport Frontier Lecture: Expanding Space

The AIAA Houston Section will have a dinner event with Dan Adamo next Thursday, January 31, 6pm, at Anita Gale’s residence!

See the flyer (PDF) for more details.

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If you’re in the Rice University area next Thursday, 1/31, check out the Houston Spaceport Frontier Lecture: Expanding Space

Aquarius, a Reusable Water-Based Interplanetary Human Spaceflight Transport

Please join the AIAA Houston Section and Daniel R. Adamo, Astrodynamics Consultant, AIAA Senior Member, and Distinguished Lecturer in a lecture that reviews major challenges to interplanetary human spaceflight and suggests strategies by which they may be addressed. These strategies include pre-emplaced Earth return consumables at the interplanetary destination, water used as a high-efficiency/high-thrust propellant also serving as crew radiation shielding, and transport servicing in a distant retrograde orbit about the Moon. Applied to a hypothetical transport christened Aquarius, the strategies are shown to enable routine and sustainable roundtrips between Earth and Deimos, the outer moon of Mars. Knowledge gaps pertaining to Aquarius are identified with the intent of motivating changes in current technology roadmaps. After listening to this lecture, anyone with interplanetary human spaceflight interests will be conversant with associated technology issues and plausible means by which they might be resolved.

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History and Astrodynamics Lunch and Learn: Reproducing an Apollo Applications Program Single-Launch Human Venus Flyby Trajectory

Reproducing an Apollo Applications Program Single-Launch Human Venus Flyby Trajectory
by Daniel R. Adamo, Astrodynamics Consultant, AIAA Senior Member, and Distinguished Lecturer

An event of AIAA Houston Section History technical committee Chair: Douglas Yazell; Members: Ted Kenny, Chester Vaughan
and
AIAA Houston Section Astrodynamics technical committee Chair: Dr. Albert Allen Jackson IV; Members: Douglas Yazell, Dr. Tim Crain

As proposed to the Apollo Applications Program by NASA’s Manned Spacecraft Center in 1967, a single Saturn 5 launch of Apollo-derived hardware could send a crew of three on a Venus flyby mission with free return to Earth one year later. Three 30-day Earth departure seasons between 1972 and 1975 were identified. The season-open trajectory for earth departure on 4 April 1972 is developed in detail for this presentation.

  • Cost: Free for presentation only. Membership not required.
  • Meal option prices (order by Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, 2:00 PM): Members $12, Non-members $15
  • Meal: Red River BBQ; brisket, spicy links, cole slaw, beans, iced tea. Vegetarian options available.

See event flyer.

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Advance registration appreciated. Walk-ins welcome.

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Dinner Meeting: Aquarius, a Reusable Water-Based Interplanetary Human Spaceflight Transport

Join the AIAA Houston Section for a lecture by Daniel Adamo, Astrodynamics consultant, AIAA senior member, and Distinguished Lecturer:

Aquarius, a Reusable Water-Based Interplanetary Human Spaceflight Transport
Saturday, January 28, 2017
6:00pm-9:00pm
University of Houston, Student Center, Space City Room

RSVP on the event page or the Eventbrite page.